Gender Equality in the Workplace in Japan-Gendered norms still a barrier

for December, 2016

Gender Equality in the Workplace in Japan-Gendered norms still a barrier

Posted on 13 December 2016 in Japanese Corporate Culture, News, womenomics -
womenomics

I recently got back from a week in Japan where I spent some time gathering information for both my ‘Promotion of Gender Equality Training’ for businesses and my academic research into the Gender Roles in Japanese Society. I met with employees from a Japanese company and spoke to other people I met to get both a male and female perspective on Womenomics and to discuss issues such as child-care and gender equality in the workplace.

Labour Participation & Female Leaders

Although the Survey of Living Conditions compiled by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare in 2015 showed a record high number of working mothers in the labour market since 2004, they are still predominately working in part-time and temporary roles. Indeed, many of the working mothers I spoke to in Tokyo supported this by agreeing that they chose to do either part-time or contract work so they could fulfil the duties of bringing up children. Furthermore, full-time working mothers were not going for promotions to managerial levels because of the immense time commitments this would entail since they were already up at 5am sorting out the house-work and children having to do more in the evening, making the long hours and responsibility of reaching managerial level at work unrealistic and unattractive. One of the men I spoke to told me how his wife was wanting to go back into the workforce but was lacking the confidence to do this. Even with his support it seems that the corporate culture and hurdles of finding child-care and fulfilling the expectations of the educational role they are still expected to play (PTA attendance being one of the major bugbears) is still not supportive of mothers returning to work with confidence and ease nor is it giving them any incentives to want to climb the corporate ladder. No surprise that a poll conducted by the Intelligence HITO Research Institute in April 2015 showed that Japanese women have little interest in becoming managers or leaders.

yokogawa-2Gender Gap Widening

Even with all the awareness raising and structural support from the Government within their Womenomics initiatives, Japan dropped even further on the Global Gender Gap Index from 101st in 2015 to 111th in 2016 . The traditional expectations of gendered behaviour in Japanese society are very ingrained and still value men as the breadwinner and women as the house-wife/child-carer with expectations of certain gendered behavioural patterns. These attitudes are used as a socialiser to influence how women feel about themselves, behave, view opportunities and their ability to change things and can be quite harsh for those women who choose to go outside of these norms.

Grass-roots Shift

Pockets of change are happening but for more sustainability and a real change in mindset, there must be a grassroots shift in the expectations of gendered behaviour, which can only really happen from early years education (more about this in my upcoming academic paper). Until then, what the Government is ideally wanting- a rise in GDP from women entering the workplace alongside a rise in the birth rate to offset the demographic time bomb and create a workforce for the future- is going to be at odds with what women can realistically achieve within society.

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Working with Tokio Marine HCC-Building the Trust and Adding to Leicestershire Links

Posted on 13 December 2016 in Inter-Cultural Training, News -

Japanese Investment adds to Leicestershire Links

Tokio Marine Holdings Inc. bought HCC Insurance Holdings Inc. last year, in one of the biggest acquisition deals by a Japanese company to date. In doing so, they sparked a curiosity within the then HCC International into Japan and its culture, initiated by its office based in the Leicestershire village of Rearsby. The HR department there felt that their staff needed to know more about Japan, as for many of the staff it was their first experience working for a Japanese company.

Raising Interest in Japan

Together with the HR department, we developed an introductory presentation for staff in Leicester and London to get an insight into current Japanese culture, society, language and corporate philosophy. There is a big interest in all things Japanese in the UK, but the two cultures are very different. The training was tailored so that participants could really grasp the basics of Japanese culture to understand current events that are happening in and around Japan, raise their cross-cultural skillset and transfer these to any direct involvement they might have with their Japanese colleagues.

Angela Baker, Head of HR for Tokio Marine HCC, said:

“We had over 185 employees attend the presentations that Sarah delivered, and the feedback that we received was very positive.  Staff enjoyed the sessions which gave a real flavour of the culture and the economic and social issues in Japan.”

I was very impressed with the genuinely positive attitudes shown towards Japan from Angela and her team and the high level of interest shown by participants through their questions and prior knowledge about Japan. Every time I visit the offices, people are always talking about Japan and they all know the name of the Japanese representative from Tokio Marine in London -Kenichi Sakakibara – better known as Ken to the local staff.

hcc

In front of the new company sign at Tokio Marine HCC, The Grange, Rearsby, Leicestershire. From left to right, Sarah Parsons (MD Japan in Perspective), Angela Baker (Head of HR) and Jane Thorpe (HR Co-ordinator)

East Midlands/Japan Regional Links

This raised awareness of and interest in Japan highlights the soft power of Japanese investment in the UK, which has not only brought economic benefits but has fostered cultural and educational exchange on a regional level. There is a lively Japanese community in the East Midlands based around Toyota Motor Manufacturing UK in Derby and NSK in Newark. The University of Leicester has an active Japanese student population and Her Imperial Highness Princess Mako (the Emperor’s grand-daughter) recently graduated from there. Leicester is also well known to the Japanese thanks to the recent success of their football club and Japanese striker Shinji Okazaki. Hopefully now, staff from the Leicester office can access the Japan – UK links already developed in the area, and create more.

 

 

To find out more about Tokio Marine HCC, please visit their website, tmhcc.com/international.

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